Thursday, November 19, 2009

Advantages of E-mail marketing

E-mail marketing (on the Internet) is popular with companies for several reasons:
 A mailing list provides the ability to distribute information to a wide range of specific, potential customers at a relatively low cost.
 Compared to other media investments such as direct mail or printed newsletters, e-mail is less expensive.
 An exact return on investment can be tracked ("track to basket") and has proven to be high when done properly. E-mail marketing is often reported as second only to search marketing as the most effective online marketing tactic.[2]
 The delivery time for an e-mail message is short (i.e., seconds or minutes) as compared to a mailed advertisement (i.e., one or more days).
 An advertiser is able to "push" the message to its audience, as opposed to website-based advertising, which relies on a customer to visit that website.
 E-mail messages are easy to track. An advertiser can track users via autoresponders, web bugs, bounce messages, unsubscribe requests, read receipts, click-throughs, etc. These mechanisms can be used to measure open rates, positive or negative responses, and to correlate sales with marketing.
 Advertisers can generate repeat business affordably and automatically.
 Advertisers can reach substantial numbers of e-mail subscribers who have opted in (i.e., consented) to receive e-mail communications on subjects of interest to them.
 Over half of Internet users check or send e-mail on a typical day.[3]
 Specific types of interaction with messages can trigger (1) other messages to be delivered automatically, or (2) other events, such as updating the profile of the recipient to indicate a specific interest category.
 E-mail marketing is paper-free (i.e., "green").
 Tracking and response metrics enables tuning and optimisation of the E-mail marketing channel by a process of testing different variants and calculation of statistically significant results.
 E-mail is popular with digital marketers, rising an estimated 15% in 2009 to £292m in the UK.[4]